As care teams become larger and are spread out over multiple sites, timely and accurate communication across the care continuum is more important than ever.

Protecting electronic patient health information (ePHI) has become even more critical since the healthcare industry has transitioned away from paper-based processes and into a more connected, electronic delivery model.

In this post, we look into the past, present, and future of healthcare communication technology. Technology has evolved significantly over time, especially when it comes to the ways in which we communicate. In the healthcare industry, the pager has played a big role in keeping healthcare teams connected, and it still does today.

The Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) has made huge impacts on our health and day-to-day life throughout the world. The virus has led to overwhelm, particularly among the teams who are supporting and caring for those who are sick.

If you step into any in-patient hospital or critical care center, you’ll notice one thing in common: near-constant, loud, piercing alarms. Of course, the purpose of an alarm is to get someone’s attention, immediately, when something abnormal occurs.

As more and more healthcare organizations move towards utilizing their professionals’ own personal digital devices as part of their duties, one question that healthcare administrators will have to face is how to choose the right secure messaging platform.

For years, the concept of “interoperability” has been something of a holy grail in the exchange of health care information. Interoperability is the open flow of electronic communication across all sectors of patient care.

Hospice and home healthcare workers play a vital role in ensuring comfort, safety, and recovery for a uniquely vulnerable clientele.